British Journal of Photography: Ones To Watch 2014

British Journal of Photography: Ones To Watch 2014

The British Journal of Photography recently launched its ‘Ones to Watch’ issue as “if you’re looking for something specific, you’ve got the internet. But a magazine should be about discovery – a place to find things you hadn’t even thought about, providing new perspectives on the talking points of the day, inviting you in on discussions between the people whose opinions count” BJP editor Simon Bainbridge states in his editorial.He continues “but I’ve always been frustrated by these kinds of surveys, which so often limit their scope to a specific geography or age group or type of institution. There is no perfect way, just as there’s no easy way to define ‘emerging’, but what I have committed to is getting nominations from every place where there is a photographic culture made by people who have an active and proven engagement with emerging photographers. So we’ve reached out far and wide to people we know who fit that remit, and searched out people who could advise us, especially on territories outside Europe and North America. In that, we were not entirely successful, but we will continue to strive to improve it for next year, and I am nonetheless certain that, with the collective knowledge and experience of our 66 advisors actively seeking nominations rather than a random call for entries, this is the most far-reaching survey of its kind.”

The results? Well, as a list goes it is quite far-reaching and one thing is certain: you won’t be disappointed! The selected photographers are:

Isabelle Wenzel, Sim Chi Yin, Arnau Blanch, Ren Hang, Alvaro Laiz, Thomas Albdorf, Kazuyoshi Usui, Txema Salvans, Aso Mohammadi, Gilles Roudière, Sarker Protick, Charlie Engman, Annegien van Doorn, Cemil Batur Gökçeer, Emile Barret, Patrick Willocq, Synchrodogs, Jon Tonks, Daisuke Yokota, Thomas Brown, Sanne De Wilde, Peter Watkins, Mathieu Cesar, Jamie Hawkesworth, Mari Bastashevski, Wasma Mansour, Louis Heilbronn, Jack Davison, Jana Romanova and Jill Quigley.

As editor of SMBHmag, Barry W Hughes was one of the nominators for this years list, and while there were a number of fantastic photographers nominated it was Russian born photographer Mari Bastashevski who was selected: “her subjects are difficult,” states Hughes “and her approach is a kind of ascetic undertaking, yet the images and text are accessible without dumbing down the context. Though the characters and situations are serious at core, none of the irony or absurdity is lost, which is not an easy thing to do when dealing with geo-political power structures. Despite the complex themes in the work, the style and attitude is nuanced, which means she avoids condescending the viewer, and so there’s an integrity present that transcends technique.”

State Business is a project about the conflict arms trade industry. By means of select case studies it explores the link between conflict geographies, a handful of industry participants, and the hidden-in-plain-view environments in which they operate. ©Mari Bastashevski, from the series State Business, 2012 - ongoing

State Business is a project about the conflict arms trade industry. By means of select case studies it explores the link between conflict geographies, a handful of industry participants, and the hidden-in-plain-view environments in which they operate.
©Mari Bastashevski, from the series State Business, 2012 – ongoing

On the 31st of December, 2001, a group of thirty armed men in military fatigues stormed the Makaev household in Urus-Martan, Chechnya. They dragged everyone out and ordered them to the ground at gunpoint. Rustam Makaev was thrown into an UAZ and driven to an undisclosed location. The following morning, Rustam's wife Louisa confronted Rem Muratovich, the colonel of the Urus-Martan military unit, with details of the abduction. The colonel confessed that Rustam was arrested by mistake, only to deny that this conversation had taken place a week later. The whereabouts of Rustam remain unknown. ©Mari Bastashevski, from the series File 126: The Topography of Abductions in The North Caucasus, 2007-2010

On the 31st of December, 2001, a group of thirty armed men in military fatigues stormed the Makaev household in Urus-Martan, Chechnya. They dragged everyone out and ordered them to the ground at gunpoint. Rustam Makaev was thrown into an UAZ and driven to an undisclosed location. The following morning, Rustam’s wife Louisa confronted Rem Muratovich, the colonel of the Urus-Martan military unit, with details of the abduction. The colonel confessed that Rustam was arrested by mistake, only to deny that this conversation had taken place a week later. The whereabouts of Rustam remain unknown.
©Mari Bastashevski, from the series File 126: The Topography of Abductions in The North Caucasus, 2007-2010

Visit the British Journal of Photography website to get your copy of Ones to Watch 2014 in print or for the iPad/iPhone.

 

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